Category Archives: Liturgy & Study

Daniel Bushin Gallagher – excerpt from “Meeting the True Dragon: A Commentary on Zen Master Dogen’s Fukanzazengi”

The following commentary has been taken, in slightly different form, from the forthcoming book, Meeting the True Dragon: A Commentary on Zen Master Dogen’s Fukanzazengi. Introduction Eihei Dogen was born in the Japanese Capital of Kyoto in 1200. He was a Dharma heir in both the Rinzai and Soto schools of Zen and is credited […]

Read more…

‘Pure Water, No Fish’- Examining the Four Noble Truths – Andy Tanzan Scott

The Four Noble Truths, along with the Eightfold Path and the Middle Way, are contained in the Buddha’s first teaching after his enlightenment. Called “Turning the Wheel of the Dharma”, this talk at Deer Park to his five former ascetic companions formed the basis of his teaching for the next forty-five years, so it is rather important. Nevertheless […]

Read more…

‘The Gateless Gate – The Tales of the Human Heart’ by Woo Young Tetsugen Yang

Which book on Zen (or Buddhism generally) has had the most impact on your life and practice and why did it particularly resonate with you? The Gateless Gate – The Tales of the Human Heart As Sensei often muses, for a tradition that prides itself in ‘without relying on letters and words, transmission outside scriptures, […]

Read more…

No creature ever falls short of its own completion. Wherever it stands it does not fail to cover the ground.

No creature ever falls short of its own completion.  Wherever it stands it does not fail to cover the ground.        Dogen Zenji I recently heard this quoted during a talk on sesshin at Crosby a few weeks ago.  It caught my attention immediately with its profound depth and wisdom.  I would like to share with […]

Read more…

Here, There, Everywhere and Nowhere. That’s where it’s at (or not….)

Sometimes in my talks I emphasise the no-self especially because most of us are more stuck in the concept of a solid, separate self than vice versa.  However, the idea of no self can be easily misconstrued.  Shakyamuni Buddha himself commented on this and he described two broad areas of possible misunderstanding.  On the one hand there are folk […]

Read more…